Skip to main content

Facebook Logout, CSRF and OAuth 2

According to http://developers.facebook.com/docs/authentication/ in order to programmatically log the user out of Facebook from an OAuth 2 client (single sign-off) is enough to redirect the user to

https://www.facebook.com/logout.php?
    next=YOUR_REDIRECT_URL
   &access_token=USER_ACCESS_TOKEN

This would require a valid access token and a valid redirect url.
Alternatively this can be achieved client side by calling FB.logout() .
In practice though there is a third (obviously not documented) unofficial way to achieve the same.
It is the case indeed that the standard log out form of Facebook suffer from CSRF.
Indeed while posting to http://www.facebook.com/logout.php the related form uses a field,  fb_dtsg, that is supposed to be an anti-CSRF token, however it is not verified properly/at all. Removing this field still resulted in successful logout!

According to Facebook (I have been in touch with them about this) this is not a security issue though (primarily because the lack of same-origin enforcement on setting and clearing cookies).

Here some collected thoughts from the Google security team about this topic : http://www.google.com/about/corporate/company/rewardprogram.html#logout-forgery
 https://sites.google.com/site/bughunteruniversity/nonvuln/logout-xsrf

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Slack SAML authentication bypass

tl;dr  I found a severe issue in the Slack's SAML implementation that allowed me to bypass the authentication. This has now been solved by Slack.
Introduction IMHO the rule #1 of any bug hunter (note I do not consider myself one of them since I do this really sporadically) is to have a good RSS feed list.  In the course of the last years I built a pretty decent one and I try to follow other security experts trying to "steal" some useful tricks. There are many experts in different fields of the security panorama and too many to quote them here (maybe another post). But one of the leading expert (that I follow) on SAML is by far Ioannis Kakavas. Indeed he was able in the last years to find serious vulnerability in the SAML implementation of Microsoft and Github. Usually I am more an "OAuth guy" but since both, SAML and OAuth, are nothing else that grandchildren of Kerberos learning SAML has been in my todo list for long time. The Github incident gave me the final…

Bug bounty left over (and rant) Part III (Google and Twitter)

tl;dr in this blog post I am going to talk about some bug bounty left over with a little rant.

Here you can find bug bounty left over part I and II
Here you can find bug bounty rant part I and II
Introduction In one of my previous post I was saying that: 

"The rule #1 of any bug hunter... is to have a good RSS feed list."
Well well well allow me in this post to state rule #2 (IMHO)

"The rule #2 of any bug hunter is to DO NOT be to fussy with 'food' specifically with left over"

aka even if the most experience bug hunter was there (and it definitely was my case here, given the fact we are talking about no one less than filedescriptor) do not assume that all the vulnerabilities have been found! So if you want some examples here we go.
Part I - GoogleI have the privilege to receive from time to time Google Vulnerability Research Grant. One of the last I received had many target options to choose from, but one in particular caught my attention, namely Google Issue T…

OpenSSL Key Recovery Attack on DH small subgroups (CVE-2016-0701)

Usual Mandatory Disclaimer: IANAC (I am not a cryptographer) so I might likely end up writing a bunch of mistakes in this blog post...

tl;dr The OpenSSL 1.0.2 releases suffer from a Key Recovery Attack on DH small subgroups. This issue got assigned CVE-2016-0701 with a severity of High and OpenSSL 1.0.2 users should upgrade to 1.0.2f. If an application is using DH configured with parameters based on primes that are not "safe" or not Lim-Lee (as the one in RFC 5114) and either Static DH ciphersuites are used or DHE ciphersuites with the default OpenSSL configuration (in particular SSL_OP_SINGLE_DH_USE is not set) then is vulnerable to this attack.  It is believed that many popular applications (e.g. Apache mod_ssl) do set the  SSL_OP_SINGLE_DH_USE option and would therefore not be at risk (for DHE ciphersuites), they still might be for Static DH ciphersuites.
Introduction So if you are still here it means you wanna know more. And here is the thing. In my last blog post I was …